Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Carol Peletier wolf build walkthrough

Now that I've debuted my wolf build, I thought I'd do a write up on how I put it together to help, or inspire, some of you on your own build, or any other build.  When I cosplay characters that I have to buy clothing for, I don't tend to buy the screen accurate stuff.  I hit the thrift stores, and the outlets/discount stores!

Let's start with her bandana's.  She has two white bandana's in this outfit.


But wait!!  That one on her head looks brown!  Using a screencap of the wolf who was wearing the outfit before Carol jacked it, it's white, and very dirty.  At least that's what I think.  You can get the bandana anywhere, but thanks to the detective work of some serious cosplayers (IDer), it's available at Michael's and Walmart.

For the bandana on her head, I actually just went ahead and dyed it brown (it didn't come in brown), then dirtied it up using acrylic paint.  The one covering her face I dyed using tea, then dirtied using acrylic paint.

Using multiple screencaps and rewatching the episode, I determined that she is wearing a very light weight, zip hoodie, and a long jacket with buttons.  The jacket might be a trench coat, but I'm unsure.  I was unable to find a light weight hoodie with a zipper in the right color.  So I took this hoodie


and modified it.  First, I dyed it darker.  Took three tries to get it as dark as I wanted.


Then, I cut up the center and added the zipper that came on my jacket.  Dirty using acrylics.  Speaking of jacket, I started with a dark blue zip up jacket.  It had a collar, made of a khaki like material, and wasn't quite long enough, but it worked.  I removed the zipper and used it for the hoodie, the dirtied the living daylights out of the jacket.  I also used sandpaper to wear out certain edges, like the collar, cuffs, etc.

The shirt I found in the mens section at a thrift store.  You just want something that is red vintage wash.  I put it in a tea soak, then dirtied it with acrylics.

The belt is brown with a gold buckle.  Make sure to dirty and distress it.

The pants are simply dark blue dress slacks.  I got these at a thrift store as well, and dirtied them up, also using the sandpaper method to distress.  I added blood at the bottom of the pants because she held a lady as she died in her lap, so I thought her pants should have blood on them.  They don't in the show, so if you are going for accuracy, skip that part.

The shoe's were an amazing find at TJ Maxx.


They're a little too light, but the overall look is close.  And only $25!  Which is a steal considering the screen accurate boots are around $180.  I scuffed these with sandpaper, then dirtied with acrylics.

I remade the knife and will have a tutorial for that next week.  The W on the forehead was obtained using red body paint, with a little black eye shadow mixed in.  I also covered my hands in blood for the convention I went to.



You're done!  Go kill some wolves!


Until next time, keep cosplaying!  Any questions, comments, or requests, leave them below!
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Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Addy Carver's Zwhacker tutorial

Hello lovelies!  I recently made a Zwhacker from ZNation and got so many requests to do a tutorial!  Which I love!  So, here it is!  First, get yourself a good reference image.



This is one of a few that I used.

What you need:
  • plastic baseball bat
  • EVA foam
  • craft foam
  • paint
  • electrical tape, or whatever your want to wrap around the bottom
First, cut out a rectangular piece of craft foam.  Measure it out around your bat, about an inch from the top.  Cut and glue in place.  I used contact cement.


Next, make rectangles out of your EVA foam.  I measured the thickness of my foam and cut long strips with the width the same as the thickness.  Then, determine how long you want your spikes.  Cut length.  Make 7 spikes.




Using scissors, or a knife, cut all of the corners, coming to a point at one end.  Heat with heat gun and roll on a flat surface until smooth.



Repeat with other spikes.  On your bat, measure and mark the halfway point and draw a line aroung the craft foam.


Measure the line.  Divide measurement by 6.  Mark off the line if increments of your answer (ie, if your line measures 6 cm, you would mark off every 6/6 cm, or every 1 cm).


Attach spikes to marks, and top.  I used contact cement.


 I did the next steps out of order.  You want to place googly eyes where the rivets are (one on each side of spike), then paint the whole thing black using plastic spray paint.  I forgot, so I had to paint my googly eyes, then attach them.




 Paint silver.  Grunge it up.  I use black and brown acrylic paint and a dry brush technique to grunge up my bat.


Add blood detailing (if wanted).  I decided to go all out fresh kill detail.  First, I did a base coat of a dark brownish red.  Load brush and pounce randomly.


On top of that, using the same method, I used bright red.



Wrap handle and you're done!
 

Until next time, keep cosplaying!  Any questions, comments, or requests, leave them below!
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Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Lady Thor (the rest, everything non armor) Tutorial

Hello lovelies! Time to finish up my Thor tutorial! Last time, I walked you through how I made my armor. This time, everything else!

Let's start at the top and work our way down.  My wig was one I had already.  It's from Arda wigs, however they recently revamped all of their wigs and no longer offer the one I got.  But, basically, you just need a blond wig.

Makeup!  Thankfully, it's Halloween season!  Which made getting black lipstick (finally!) super easy!  If you don't have black lipstick, you can use body paint, or eyeliner.  Lipstick is just easier.

Shirt.  For her shirt, I actually made my own pattern by wrapping myself in plastic wrap, covering that in duct tape, and drawing my design.  Then, I cut it out, transferred to wax paper with a 1/2" seam allowance, and sewed together.  I used a black fabric that had a sort of faux leather look, but was see-through, and lined it with regular black lining fabric.







Pants.  I used Simplicity Amazing Fit 1696, utilizing the average fit pattern.  No alterations to this pattern.  I used a black pleather fabric, which was a pain to sew, and some scrap nonstretchy fabric I had lying around for the pockets, fly, and waistband.  Pleather tip: have plenty of plastic bags handy and sandwich the pleather in plastic to make it glide through your machine better.


Skirts!  I whipped up a basic waistband (make it yourself, or utilize one from a pattern) and then pinned the fabric, using pleats, until I got the look I liked.  For the dark brown bit in front, I made a paper pattern, tested the sizing, then sewed.  Get some trim you like, and make the design.






Cape.  I actually utilized a cape tutorial I found, and just made the shoulder attachments a touch narrower.  Also, I added velcro and left out the elastic arm holes.  Tutorial here!

Belts.  I splurged on my belt and used real leather.  I made a paper template, tested it, then cut it out of my leather.  I used googly eyes painted black then silver for the details.  Grommets along the back edges, and leather string to lace up.  Also used the leftover leather to make the loops.





Leg wraps.  I hate leg wraps.  I wrapped my leg in plastic wrap, covered in duct tape, drew my design, then cut it out.  I used that as a pattern for my wraps, adding in 1/2" seam allowance.  Cut from fabric.  Then, using the light tan fabric, I cut strips and laid them over the wraps in random patterns.  When I liked it, I pinned in place, and sewed.  Then, add a zipper.  Mine were a little big, so I also ended up adding some elastic to the top to keep them snug.









The zipper I had on hand was too long, but these go into the boots, so I just fold it up inside the wrap.  Didn't have any problems with it.

And finally, the hammer!  First, get some super thick foam board.  Create a template for your hammer.  Cut out multiple's of your template from the foam until you reach the desired thickness.






Glue together (I used contact cement).  Use paperclay to cover the sides and hide any unevenness.





Sand.  It does not need to be super smooth, but it shouldn't be lumpy.  Measure and mark where your handle will go.  Cut out.  I used a circle cutting drill bit.




Paint.  I used valspar stone spray paint in manhattan mist.  This stuff is incredible!





Glue in your handle.  I used contact glue.  Then, cover handle in leftover leather.  Make sure to create a hand loop.



That's it!  If you followed both tutorials, you should have something that looks like this:


Until next time, keep cosplaying!  Any questions, comments, or requests, leave them below!
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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

All New Thor (Lady Thor) Armor tutorial

Hello lovelies!  Sorry it's been so long.  But I'm back!  So, this is tutorial is going to be a walk through of how I made my Thor armor, as well as links to the youtube channel I utilized for technique.  I highly recommend you watch the youtube videos first, then come back to my blog. 

Evil Ted, foam armor genius!

Evil Ted has numerous videos.  I watched basically all of them, even though some of them didn't really apply to what I was making (or so I thought).  Seriously, watch them all!  There are techniques he uses in all of them, and sometimes a tutorial you assume won't work for you (male foam armor), will (used a technique in that video for my bracer).

On to the walk through!

Now, right off, I got super discouraged because my first chest plate didn't look very good.  But I did some research, found Evil Ted, and my second attempt was much better! 


Alright!  I'm going to assume you've watched those videos and are ready to start!.  First, wrap yourself in plastic wrap, cover in duct tape, and draw out your pattern!






Use this for your base (not the triangular bits).  Use the templates you just created to make your armor.  Follow Evil Ted's tutorial for creating templates and gluing armor.





Now, for the triangular bits at the top, I created a rough draft on paper, held the armor up to test size/fit, a resized if necessary.


For the circles, I used the bottom of a glass as a template.  Now, the circle bits have a raised portion.  I attempted to make this out of foam, but was unhappy with it, so I ended up finding giant googly eyes and using those.  So some of the pictures will have the foam cone, others the googly eyes.  Also do the diamond detail at center bottom.


Now, use the tutorial (EvilTed) for smoothing the seams.

For the back plate, I used the same technique as the front, except I made it one large piece.  I made these templates separately.  It would probably be easier to do them at the same time, but lesson learned.

After your seams are filled, prep with glue coats, then primer.  Then paint.

Helmet!  Man, the helmet was a nightmare for me.  The first one was terrible.  The second was better, but not quite right.  I was able to alter the second one to get my third and final helmet.  First, watch the video for making a helmet.  Next, with help, cover your face with plastic wrap, then duct tape (or paper tape). Use that template to cut and glue your foam pieces.  I used EVA foam for the base of the helmet.  My second attempt used craft foam for the face plate.  Later, I cut that out and used a mask I got at the craft store.





Now, I couldn't keep my blade sharp enough, so my gaps were pretty big.  I tried using Evil Ted's smoothing method, but my cuts were so bad, it wasn't working.  Therefore, I covered the entire helmet (minus face) in bondo and sanded for days.  I also had to use bondo for my chest plate for the same reason.


Next, add your details.  Because I had to bondo my helmet, I did the mustache looking detail as a raised element instead of a recessed element like it should have been.  The cone was made by making a large circle out of  craft foam and cutting out a small wedge.  I kept checking the cone size, and made the wedge larger until I was satisfied with the size.
 


Now, for my final helmet, I used a store bought mask.  Holding it in place, I traced along the inside where it would sit.  Then, I used a dremel to hollow these areas out.  Then, using contact cement, I glued the mask in place.  Then I used wood filler to smooth the transition between helmet and mask.





Seal, prime, and paint.

Bracer time.  This was probably the easiest element to make.  I traced my arm onto a piece of waxpaper, sketched out the armor, then used it as a base to cut out my foam pieces, making sure everything overlapped.  Seal, paint, prime. Then, using the overlapping armor technique from Evil Ted's male armor tutorial, I attached them to each other.  Left over belts from my Furiosa cosplay were utilized to create straps.





Shoes.  I bought a pair of clog like shoes from a thrift store for a few dollars, then modified them.  Using paper, tape to the shoes and make your designs.  Use templates to cut craft foam and use contact cement to glue in place.  Mine were backless, so I first added a back.






Once happy, glue in place.  Next, I used a sewing measuring tape and measured the opening for the cuff piece.  I actually ended up not being happy with this bit and wish I would have worked on it a bit more.  I could see directly into my shoe when I looked down.  I don't think it was noticeable to anyone else.







Sketch out the wings.  Check that the size works, then cut out of foam and glue.






Seal, prime, paint.






That's it for the armor tutorial!  I hope this helps!  I will also make a breakdown post that gives information of what sewing patterns I used for the pants, how to make the pattern for the shirt, how I made the skirts and belt, and the tutorial I used for my cape.  I'll conclude with a full tutorial for my hammer.


Until next time, keep cosplaying!  Any questions, comments, or requests, leave them below!
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